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Mayoff.com Now Provides Browser Icons on Many of its Pages

Browser Icons as described by Bernie Mayoff...
If you have a browser that supports them then you don't do anything, they just appear. If you don't have a browser that supports them then there isn't anything that you can do (shy of upgrading browsers) and you don't even know they exist.

Internet Explorer v6 (and maybe 5) display them in the Favorites list, and let you drag them to the desktop. In the future it may display them in the URL bar too. Netscape 7 Compact (and maybe the regular version but I'm not sure) displays them in the URL bar. In the future it will display them in the Bookmark list and let you drag them to the desktop. The latest version of Mozilla probably displays them in the URL bar and may handle the bookmarks and dragging. Future versions will. I don't know about Opera or AOL. I can't think of the names of any other browsers, but I'm sure there are others.

Netscape 7 has a feature that is apparently unique to NS 7 and Mozilla, that is called tabbed browsing. Again, you don't do anything to take advantage of the icons, but they are nice. Below is a screen shot that shows you what I mean.

You'll notice that right above the mayoff.com banner there are 6 "tabs". (You might have to scroll horizontally to see them all in the graphic) Each tab is a lot like a separate browser window, but there are some advantages, and one limitation. The limitation is that I can only look at one tab at a time. If I want to see more than one web page at the same time then I would open another browser "window", the way you are used to doing it.

In the example you are seeing, first I opened mayoff.com. The results of that are what you are seeing in the leftmost tab. Then I made it open another blank tab and I used that tab to load Richard and Cheryl's web page. You are seeing that in the second tab. They didn't create an icon for it so you are seeing the default icon that is supposed to look like a little bookmark. Then I clicked on the first tab and mayoff.com immediately popped up again, no waiting, no reloading of anything. From the mayoff.com home page I right-clicked on the link to the photo page and chose "open in new tab". It loaded that page in the background while I continued to look at the home page. I did the same thing with the link to Mayoff Day and it also loaded in the background while I stayed on the home page. You are seeing the results of those two steps in the third and fourth tab. I can bounce back and forth among the tabs faster than I could bounce between browser windows.

Then I had it open another blank tab and I loaded my home page, which happens to be a netscape.com page, so you are seeing their icon in the fifth tab. From that tab I opened a CNN newstory and you're seeing that in the last tab. Typically I might get several news stories to start loading. I can look at anyone of them while the rest keep loading. I can close a tab and go back to the base and load more tabs. I'm sure it is wiser to understand in practice than by reading about it.

In the Windows environment if something opens in another browser window then netscape waits while it loads. With tabs they load in the background so that is a big advantage. On a Windows or Linux system you would open a tab by right clicking. I don't know how that would be done on a Mac.